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Still in Nassau… May 25, 2008

Posted by Kim in Bahamas, Cruising, Fishing, My Trip Logs, Travel.
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Nassau from BridgeWe’re still here… after one night’s absence that is. New photos have been added to my Flickr Album. Read about it here in my continuing log:

5/22/08 – 5/23/08 Nassau to Hoffman Cay then Back to Nassau

Though we are away from the dock early, it is 0800 before we cruise out of the harbor. This is the Bahamas and one must remember that everyone here is on “island time”. Fifteen minutes after pulling up to the first fuel dock we find out that they have no diesel. This after they passed the hose aboard and a failed attempt on our part to pump fuel… We also purchase several bags of their $7.50/bag ice to find that their 3 foot high sign advertising the price is wrong and the actual price for the past year is $12/bag. We then proceed to a second fuel dock and here have to wait another 20 minutes for the attendant to show up and figure out how to start the pumps. So much for an early start…

Before we loose sight of Nassau, we have our first fish on board. It is a large Mahi and the first of several that would make up the best day of fishing we have had so far this trip. Between Nassau and Hoffman’s Cay, one of the Berry Islands, we run into a large area of ocean covered by tennis court sized patches of floating grass. There seems to be large numbers of very big Mahi under each of these and we hang into many of them. Early, around 1300, we have our limit of fish and head for our anchorage behind Hoffman’s Cay. We anchored at this spot several years ago and Tommy wanted to show Bill the “Blue Hole” that’s located on Hoffman’s Cay. A blue hole is a deep, cavernous, land locked hole connected underground to the ocean. This one on Hoffman’s Cay is probably three, four hundred feet across with no bottom in sight. This also gives us a chance to use the inflatable boat we have with us for the first time this trip. They launch the boat, attach the small outboard motor, check the fuel and set out for the island. It takes them a couple of landings before they find the path to the blue hole. On the trip back from their visit to the blue hole, the boys find out that just because you can see fuel in an outboard motor’s fuel tank that doesn’t mean there is enough fuel to run the engine. They run out of gas just after leaving shore to return to the Arcon. Here they are, behind the island and over a mile away from the boat in the grips of a raging, sea going current. Out come the oars and very quickly they learn that these small oars are not sufficient to fight these strong currents. One step forward and three steps back. Bill jumps overboard and pulls the raft to shallow water where they both wade and pull the boat over the shallow reef dodging rays and other denizens of the deep. Two hours later, tired and rattled, and minus one oar, they make it back to the boat. Memories are made of this… It is a quiet evening. We have a simple supper of hot dogs, sauerkraut and baked beans before turning in.

The weather report indicates that a cold front is expected to pass over Nassau Saturday night and there will be high seas over the Gulf Stream for the next several days. Tommy decides to return to Nassau to wait it out and to let Col. Bill fly home as the chance now of us reaching Tampa by the 27th, Bill’s deadline for a previous engagement, is remote. We will have a couple of additional days in Nassau to unwind.

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